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Protected: Forgotten administrator password

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Microsoft is sending you Windows 10 by download. Whether you want it or not.

It looks like Microsoft is doing what everyone was trying to say “They would never do”. Forcing Windows 10 on us even if it’s not wanted. If you have Automatic Updates turned on and using one of the versions of Windows that qualify for the Free upgrade then your computer will download the 6 Plus gigabytes of install files for Windows 10. It will store it in a hidden folder until you are ready to install Windows 10. So if your Internet is metered it may end up costing you or eating up your data allotment. If you have a slow Internet connection, that connection may come to a crawl while the install files are being downloaded without you even being aware.
For more info and ways to remove and avoid the Windows 10 forceware, follow the link below.
http://www.infoworld.com/article/2983777/microsoft-windows/how-to-clean-the-windows-10-crapware-off-your-windows-7-or-81-pc.html?phint=newt%3Dinfoworld_tech_microsoft&phint=idg_eid%3Dea78f4e9f91acff80886369fb6066d7c#tk.IFWNLE_nlt_entwindows_2015-09-16

Posted in Windows 7 Tips, Windows 8 | Leave a comment

How to Unlock a Word Document under Windows

Some authors (for example, of forms to be filled out) “lock” their documents under Windows. This is annoying, as it prevents you from fixing errors or adding anything to the document.
If you web-search on “unlock word document” or “unlocking word document” you get a bunch of pages with advice that doesn’t work under Windows, or pointers to paid software. Here is a method that works, and is free:
1. Open your document in Word, then save it in “.xml” format.
2. Open the .xml doc in wordpad, notepad, emacs, or your favorite text editor.
3. Search for the string w:enforcement=”1″.
4. Replace the “1” with a “0” to disable enforcement (this step unlocks the document).
5. Save the .xml document from your text editor.
6. Open the .xml document in Word.
7. Choose “Save as…” and save it as a .doc or .docx file.
Your original Word document can now be edited normally. Enjoy!

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Recover a corrupted registry that prevents Windows XP from starting

When you try to start or restart your Windows XP-based computer, you may receive one of the following error messages:
Windows XP could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SYSTEM
Windows XP could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SOFTWARE
Stop: c0000218 {Registry File Failure} The registry cannot load the hive (file): \SystemRoot\System32\Config\SOFTWARE or its log or alternate
System error: Lsass.exe
When trying to update a password the return status indicates that the value provided as the current password is not correct.
Recover a corrupted registry that prevents Windows XP from starting
The procedure that this article describes uses Recovery Console and System Restore. This article also lists all the required steps in specific order to make sure that the process is fully completed. When you finish this procedure, the system returns to a state very close to the state before the problem occurred. If you have ever run NTBackup and completed a system state backup, you do not have to follow the procedures in parts two and three. You can go to part four.
Part one
In part one, you start the Recovery Console, create a temporary folder, back up the existing registry files to a new location, delete the registry files at their existing location, and then copy the registry files from the repair folder to the System32\Config folder. When you have finished this procedure, a registry is created that you can use to start Windows XP. This registry was created and saved during the initial setup of Windows XP. Therefore any changes and settings that occurred after the Setup program was finished are lost.
To complete part one, follow these steps:
Insert the Windows XP startup disk into the floppy disk drive, or insert the Windows XP CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, and then restart the computer.
Click to select any options that are required to start the computer from the CD-ROM drive if you are prompted to do so.
When the “Welcome to Setup” screen appears, press R to start the Recovery Console.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the installation that you want to access from the Recovery Console.
When you are prompted to do so, type the Administrator password. If the administrator password is blank, just press ENTER.
At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
md tmp
copy c:\windows\system32\config\system c:\windows\tmp\system.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\software c:\windows\tmp\software.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\sam c:\windows\tmp\sam.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\security c:\windows\tmp\security.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\default c:\windows\tmp\default.bak
delete c:\windows\system32\config\system
delete c:\windows\system32\config\software
delete c:\windows\system32\config\sam
delete c:\windows\system32\config\security
delete c:\windows\system32\config\default
copy c:\windows\repair\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\repair\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\repair\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\repair\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\repair\default c:\windows\system32\config\default
Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer will restart.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.
If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step five, and then create a text file called “Regcopy1.txt” (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy1.txt
With the batch command in Recovery Console, you can process all the commands in a text file sequentially. When you use the batch command, you do not have to manually type as many commands.
Part two
To complete the procedure described in this section, you must be logged on as an administrator, or an administrative user (a user who has an account in the Administrators group). If you are using Windows XP Home Edition, you can log on as an administrative user. If you log on as an administrator, you must first start Windows XP Home Edition in Safe mode. To start the Windows XP Home Edition computer in Safe mode, follow these steps.
Note Print these instructions before you continue. You cannot view these instructions after you restart the computer in Safe Mode. If you use the NTFS file system, also print the instructions from Knowledge Base article KB309531. Step 7 contains a reference to the article.
Click Start, click Shut Down (or click Turn Off Computer), click Restart, and then click OK (or click Restart).
Press the F8 key.
On a computer that is configured to start to multiple operating systems, you can press F8 when you see the Startup menu.
Use the arrow keys to select the appropriate Safe mode option, and then press ENTER.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, use the arrow keys to select the installation that you want to access, and then press ENTER.
In part two, you copy the registry files from their backed up location by using System Restore. This folder is not available in Recovery Console and is generally not visible during typical usage. Before you start this procedure, you must change several settings to make the folder visible:
Start Windows Explorer.
On the Tools menu, click Folder options.
Click the View tab.
Under Hidden files and folders, click to select Show hidden files and folders, and then click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box.
Click Yes when the dialog box that confirms that you want to display these files appears.
Double-click the drive where you installed Windows XP to display a list of the folders. If is important to click the correct drive.
Open the System Volume Information folder. This folder is unavailable and appears dimmed because it is set as a super-hidden folder.
Note This folder contains one or more _restore {GUID} folders such as “_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}”.
Note You may receive the following error message:
C:\System Volume Information is not accessible. Access is denied.
If you receive this message, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article to gain access to this folder and continue with the procedure:
309531 How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Open a folder that was not created at the current time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to see when these folders were created. There may be one or more folders starting with “RPx under this folder. These are restore points.
Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder. The following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder:
C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EB-A81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot
From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\Windows\Tmp folder:
_REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM
Rename the files in the C:\Windows\Tmp folder as follows:
Rename _REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT to DEFAULT
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY to SECURITY
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE to SOFTWARE
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM to SYSTEM
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM to SAM
These files are the backed up registry files from System Restore. Because you used the registry file that the Setup program created, this registry does not know that these restore points exist and are available. A new folder is created with a new GUID under System Volume Information and a restore point is created that includes a copy of the registry files that were copied during part one. Therefore, it is important not to use the most current folder, especially if the time stamp on the folder is the same as the current time.
The current system configuration is not aware of the previous restore points. You must have a previous copy of the registry from a previous restore point to make the previous restore points available again.
The registry files that were copied to the Tmp folder in the C:\Windows folder are moved to make sure that the files are available under Recovery Console. You must use these files to replace the registry files currently in the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder. By default, Recovery Console has limited folder access and cannot copy files from the System Volume folder.
Note The procedure described in this section assumes that you are running your computer with the FAT32 file system. For more information about how to access the System Volume Information Folder with the NTFS file system, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
309531 How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Part Three
In part three, you delete the existing registry files, and then copy the System Restore Registry files to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder:
Start Recovery Console.
At the command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
del c:\windows\system32\config\sam
del c:\windows\system32\config\security
del c:\windows\system32\config\software
del c:\windows\system32\config\default
del c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\tmp\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\tmp\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\tmp\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\tmp\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\tmp\default c:\windows\system32\config\default
Note Some of these command lines may be wrapped for readability.
Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer restarts.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.
If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called “Regcopy2.txt” (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy2.txt
Part Four
Click Start, and then click All Programs.
Click Accessories, and then click System Tools.
Click System Restore, and then click Restore to a previous RestorePoint.

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Need a Windows 7 DVD? Microsoft has you covered.

Things have changed but Windows 7 downloads are still available just in a different place with different instructions.
As much as I hate outdated information popping up in search results, I have left the old instructions here in case you already have the ISO files downloaded and need to put them on a DVD.
Goto https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows7

Before you begin

  • Make sure you have:
    • Your Windows product key (xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx). Learn more.
    • An internet connection (internet service provider fees may apply).
    • Sufficient data storage available on a computer, USB or external drive for the download.
    • A blank USB or DVD (and DVD burner) with at least 4 GB of space if you want to create media. We recommend using a blank USB or blank DVD, because any content on it will be deleted.

Windows 7 Downloads are still available.
Download the appropriate Windows 7 .ISO file which includes Service Pack 1
(Note: must match what your product key version is for)
Windows 7 Home Premium 32Bit: http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-58996.iso
Windows 7 Home Premium 64Bit: http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-58997.iso
Windows 7 Professional 32Bit: http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59183.iso
Windows 7 Professional 64Bit: http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59186.iso
Windows 7 Ultimate 32Bit: http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59463.iso
Windows 7 Ultimate 64Bit: http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59465.iso
These are not branded recovery disks, but the OEM version. You may need drivers for your system and application that were installed by the manufacturer won’t be included. You will also need your COA. (Certificate of Authenticity sticker)
How to find out if I have a 32 or 64Bit version of Windows installed on my computer:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/find-out-32-or-64-bit
After downloading the correct .iso file use ImgBurn or Gear ISO to create a bootable DVD.
Create a Bootable Windows 7 DVD using the .ISO file
Burning a Windows 7 ISO File on a DVD
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/977640
ImgBurn – In addition to supporting the creation of Cds/DVDs from .ISO files,
it supports a wide range of other image file formats, and it’s free.
(BIN, CUE, DI, DVD, GI, IMG, MDS, NRG, PDI and ISO)
http://www.imgburn.com/
Screen shots to help you use ImgBurn: http://www.imgburn.com/index.php?act=screenshots
Burning ISO Images with ImgBurn article: http://neosmart.net/wiki/display/G/Burning+ISO+Images+with+ImgBurn
(The steps are the same for Windows 7 or Windows 8), except you are not creating a Repair disc but a full installation DVD)
Note: Always use high quality DVD+R media and the slowest burn speed (4x or 6x) if offered a choice.

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A List of Run Commands for Windows 7

Windows logo key + R
Administrative Tools
Administrative Tools = control admintools
Authorization Manager = azman.msc
Component Services = dcomcnfg
Certificate Manager = certmgr.msc
Direct X Troubleshooter = dxdiag
Display Languages = lpksetup
ODBC Data Source Administrator = odbcad32
File Signature Verification Tool = sigverif
Group Policy Editor = gpedit.msc
Add Hardware Wizard = hdwwiz.cpl
iSCSI Initiator = iscsicpl
Iexpress Wizard = iexpress
Local Security Settings = secpol.msc
Microsoft Support Diagnostic Tool = msdt
Microsoft Management Console = mmc
Print management = printmanagement.msc
Printer User Interface = printui
Problems Steps Recorder = psr
People Near Me = p2phost
Registry Editor = regedit or regedt32
Resoure Monitor = resmon
System Configuration Utility = msconfig
Resultant Set of Policy = rsop.msc
SQL Server Client Configuration = cliconfg
Task Manager = taskmgr
Trusted Platform Module = tpm.msc
TPM Security Hardware = TpmInit
Windows Remote Assistance = msra
Windows Share Folder Creation Wizard = shrpubw
Windows Standalong Update Manager = wusa
Windows System Security Tool = syskey
Windows Script Host Settings = wscript
Windows Version = winver
Windows Firewall with Advanced Security = wf.msc
Windows Memory Diagnostic = MdSched
Windows Malicious Removal Tool = mrt
Computer Management
Computer Management = compmgmt.msc or CompMgmtLauncher
Task Scheduler = control schedtasks
Event Viewer = eventvwr.msc
Shared Folders/MMC = fsmgmt.msc
Local Users and Groups = lusrmgr.msc
Performance Monitor = perfmon.msc
Device Manager = devmgmt.msc
Disk Management = diskmgmt.msc
Services = services.msc
Windows Management Infrastructure = wmimgmt.msc
Conrtol Panel
Control Panel = control
Action Center= wscui.cpl
Autoplay = control.exe /name Microsoft.autoplay
Backup and Restore = sdclt
Create a System Repair disc = recdisc
BDE Administrator = bdeadmin.cpl
Color Management = colorcpl
Credential Manager = control.exe /name Microsoft.CredentialManager
Credential Manager Stored User Names and Passwords = credwiz
Date and Time Properties = timedate.cpl
Default Programs = control.exe /name Microsoft.DefaultPrograms
Set Program Access and Computer Defaults = control appwiz.cpl,,3 or ComputerDefaults
Devices and Printers = control printers
Devices and Printers Add a Device = DevicePairingWizard
Display = dpiscaling
Screen Resolution = desk.cpl
Display Color Calibration = dccw
Cleartype Text Tuner = cttune
Folders Options = control folders
Fonts = control fonts
Getting Started = GettingStarted
HomeGroup = control.exe /name Microsoft.HomeGroup
Indexing Options = control.exe /name Microsoft.IndexingOptions
Internet Properties = inetcpl.cpl
Keyboard = control keyboard
Location and Other Sensors = control.exe /name Microsoft.LocationandOtherSensors
Location Notifications = LocationNotifications
Mouse = control mouse or main.cpl
Network and Sharing Center = control.exe /name Microsoft.NetworkandSharingCenter
Network Connections = control netconnections or ncpa.cpl
Notification Area Icons = control.exe /name Microsoft.NotificationAreaIcons
Parental Controls = control.exe /name Microsoft.ParentalControls
Performance Information = control.exe /name Microsoft.PerformanceInformationandTools
Personalization = control desktop
Windows Color and Appearance = control color
Phone and Modem Options = telephon.cpl
Power Configuration = powercfg.cpl
Programs and Features = appwiz.cpl or control appwiz.cpl
Optional Features Manager = optionalfeatures or control appwiz.cpl,,2
Recovery = control.exe /name Microsoft.Recovery
Regional and Language = intl.cpl
RemoteApp = control.exe /name Microsoft.RemoteAppandDesktopConnections
Sound = mmsys.cpl
Volume Mixer = sndvol
System Properties = sysdm.cpl or Windows logo key + Pause/Break
SP ComputerName Tab = SystemPropertiesComputerName
SP Hardware Tab = SystemPropertiesHardware
SP Advanced Tab = SystemPropertiesAdvanced
SP Performance = SystemPropertiesPerformance
SP Data Execution Prevention = SystemPropertiesDataExecutionPrevention
SP Protection Tab = SystemPropertiesProtection
SP Remote Tab = SystemPropertiesRemote
Windows Activation = slui
Windows Activation Phone Numbers = slui 4
Taskbar and Start Menu = control.exe /name Microsoft.TaskbarandStartMenu
Troubleshooting = control.exe /name Microsoft.Troubleshooting
User Accounts = control.exe /name Microsoft.UserAccounts
User Account Control Settings = UserAccountControlSettings
User Accounts Windows 2000/domain version = netplwiz or control userpasswords2
Encryption File System = rekeywiz
Windows Anytime Upgrade = WindowsAnytimeUpgradeui
Windows Anytime Upgrade Results = WindowsAnytimeUpgradeResults
Windows CardSpace = control.exe /name Microsoft.cardspace
Windows Firewall = firewall.cpl
WindowsSideshow = control.exe /name Microsoft.WindowsSideshow
Windows Update App Manager = wuapp
Accessories
Calculator = calc
Command Prompt = cmd
Connect to a Network Projector = NetProj
Presentation Settings = PresentationSettings
Connect to a Projector = displayswitch or Windows logo key + P
Notepad = notepad
Microsoft Paint = mspaint.exe
Remote Desktop Connection = mstsc
Run = Windows logo key + R
Snipping Tool = snippingtool
Sound Recorder = soundrecorder
Sticky Note = StikyNot
Sync Center = mobsync
Windows Mobility Center (Only on Laptops) = mblctr or Windows logo key + X
Windows Explorer = explorer or Windows logo key + E
Wordpad = write
Ease of Access Center = utilman or Windows logo key + U
Magnifier = magnify
Narrator = Narrator
On Screen Keyboard = osk
Private Character Editor = eudcedit
Character Map = charmap
Ditilizer Calibration Tool = tabcal
Disk Cleanup Utility = cleanmgr
Defragment User Interface = dfrgui
Internet Explorer = iexplore
Rating System = ticrf
Internet Explorer (No Add-ons) = iexplore -extoff
Internet Explorer (No Home) = iexplore about:blank
Phone Dialer = dialer
Printer Migration = PrintBrmUi
System Information = msinfo32
System Restore = rstrui
Windows Easy Transfer = migwiz
Windows Media Player = wmplayer
Windows Media Player DVD Player = dvdplay
Windows Fax and Scan Cover Page Editor = fxscover
Windows Fax and Scan = wfs
Windows Image Acquisition = wiaacmgr
Windows PowerShell ISE = powershell_ise
Windows PowerShell = powershell
XPS Viewer = xpsrchvw
Open Documents folder = documents
Open Pictures folder = pictures
Open Music folder = music
Open Videos folder = videos
Open Downloads folder = downloads
Open Favorites folder = favorites
Open Recent folder = recent
Logs out of Windows = logoff
Locks User Account = Windows logo Key + L

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Thinking of buying a Chromebook – Here is a good explaination of a chromebook

Put Chromebooks in proper context: This is not a joke – TechRepublic.

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Wish you had the old Start Menu back in windows 8?

A very simple way to do this is by using a feature available since the taskbar debuted in Windows 95!
Right-click the taskbar
Select Toolbars > New Toolbar…
Point it to “C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs”

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10 things to try when applications won't work with Windows 8

Takeaway: If you have problems getting an app to run on Windows 8, all’s not lost. One of these strategies or workarounds may get the application running.
Windows 8 is more forgiving with regard to application compatibility than some of the previous versions of Windows were, but some applications just will not work with it. Thankfully, you don’t always have to accept defeat. Although there is no silver bullet that guarantees application compatibility, you can use a number of tricks to improve your odds of getting a stubborn application to run in Windows 8.
1: Create a virtual machine
I will go ahead and get the last resort step out of the way up front. Windows 8 includes its own copy of Hyper-V. If you can’t get an application to function in Windows 8, you can enable Hyper-V and create a virtual machine running a legacy version of Windows as a way of running the application.
2: Turn off User Account Control
I haven’t experienced any User Account Control (UAC)-related compatibility problems in Windows 8 yet, but I have run into problems in Windows 7. When I first adopted Windows 7, there was a particular dictation application that would not work until I disabled UAC. I have read posts on the Internet from people who have had similar experiences in Windows 8, where disabling UAC resolved a compatibility issue.
3: Install .NET Framework 3.5
When you install Windows 8, version 4.5 of the .NET Framework is installed by default. However, older apps often require an earlier version of the .NET Framework. If you receive a .NET Framework-related error, you can go into the Control Panel, click on Programs, and choose the option to turn a Windows feature on or off. Windows will display a list of the various components you can enable or disable. One of the items on the list is .NET Framework 3.5, which also includes .NET 3.0 and 2.0. Installing this component will likely correct the issue that you are experiencing.
4: Check for application patches
One of the first things you should do upon discovering an application compatibility problem is contact the application vendor and find out if it has a Windows 8 patch available. Sometimes, a patch is all you need.
5: Upgrade to the next version
When I made the switch to Windows 8, I discovered that a video-editing application I use on a regular basis would not work with Windows 8. Although I might have been able to resolve the problem using less drastic measures, I ultimately decided to simply upgrade to the newest version of the application. Not only was the latest version certified to work with Windows 8, but it also had some other new features I wanted to try out.
6: Upgrade your hardware drivers
One of the biggest problems I had when I upgraded to Windows 8 was that a program I use every day wouldn’t run. The error message I received indicated that Windows 8 did not support OpenGL. However, OpenGL support is provided by the video driver, not by the operating system. It turned out that my problem was caused by an outdated version of AMD Catalyst. When I upgraded to the latest version, the problem went away and I was able to run the application.
7: Let Windows troubleshoot the problem
Windows 8 includes a utility called the Program Compatibility Troubleshooter that can sometimes automatically resolve compatibility problems. You can run the Program Compatibility Troubleshooter by right-clicking on the problematic application and choosing the Troubleshoot Compatibility command from the shortcut menu.
8: Trick the application into thinking it is running on an earlier version of Windows
Some applications are hard-coded to look for a specific version of Windows. In these types of situations, you can configure Windows 8 to lie to the application about what version of Windows you’re running. Start by running the Program Compatibility Troubleshooter (as described above). When you get to the What Problems Do You Notice screen, choose the option for programs that worked in an earlier version of Windows. After clicking Next, you will have the option of telling the utility which version of Windows the application worked in.
9: Provide the application with extra permissions
Some legacy applications (especially those written for Windows XP) fail to run due to inadequate permissions. Once again, the Program Compatibility Troubleshooter can help. When you get to the What Problems Do You Notice screen, choose the option related to the program requiring additional permissions. As an alternative, you could try right-clicking on the application and choosing the Run As Administrator option (assuming that you have administrative permissions).
10: Check the Compatibility Center
One last thing you can do is check the Compatibility Center for information about the application. The Compatibility Center is a Web site Microsoft uses to provide application compatibility information for Windows 7 and 8. In some instances, it provides a link to detailed instructions on what you must do to make an otherwise-incompatible application work with Windows 8.

Posted in Windows 8 | Leave a comment